anterior cruciate ligament Archives | Jeremy M. Burnham, MD

Orthopedic Surgery, Sports Medicine, & Knee Doctor | Board Certified


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All Posts Tagged: anterior cruciate ligament

Functional Progression After ACL Surgery

The following parameters should serve as a general guideline for functional progression after ACL reconstruction. These guidelines should not replace surgeon and therapist judgement. When Can I Jog After ACL Surgery? Clearance for Jogging can be tested at 12 weeks if isolated ligament reconstruction or 16 weeks with Meniscal involvement/bone bruise/microfracture Minimum Standard 30 Step […]

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Timing of Common ACL Postoperative Milestones

Many patients and healthcare providers have questions regarding the timing of certain milestones after ACL surgery. The following time points are evidence-based, but will vary from patient to patient. These findings are also based on isolated ACL reconstruction, and will be different if additional procedures are performed at the same time (meniscus repair, cartilage restoration, […]

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Pediatric & Adolescent Tibial Eminence Fracture

Background Fractures of the tibial eminence, or tibial spines, are a type of knee injury often treatment by a sports medicine knee doctor. Tibial eminence fractures are bony avulsions of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) from its attachment to the tibia. Tibial eminence fractures are fairly rare and account for about 2-5% of pediatric knee injuries. […]

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New Research Article on Female ACL Injuries

Dr. Burnham co-authored a research study with Dr. Vonda Wright on female ACL tears. Dr. Wright is an orthopaedic surgeon who is an expert in sports medicine and fitness. This article reviews the most recent research on ACL injuries in female athletes. The rate of anterior cruciate ligament injuries is on the rise in female athletes. It is important that ACL surgery is not done on a “one-size-fits-all” basis, but rather must be individualized for each patient. ACL rehabilitation programs should target the hip, core, and trunk neuromuscular control. A team approach including the surgeon, athletic trainer, physical therapist, coach, family, and patient is paramount to success.

The research study was performed at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Sports Medicine.

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New Research Article on the Anterolateral Complex of the Knee

Dr. Burnham co-authored a research study with Dr. Freddie Fu, Dr. Volker Musahl, Dr. Elmart Herbst, and Dr. Marcio Albers on a hot topic in sports medicine. The research article describes the complex anatomy and function of the anterolateral knee, including the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and the anterolateral complex, which have received much focus in recent media stories. These anatomical structures play an important role in knee stability, especially in the setting of ACL injury and ACL reconstruction in athletes.

The research study was performed at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Sports Medicine.

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Return to Play after ACL Surgery (New Research) – Single Leg Step-Down Test

Dr. Burnham and colleagues recently published a research study on a test that may be useful in determining when patients can return to sports after ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) reconstruction. The test is called the Single Leg Step-Down test (SLSD). It has been shown to identify patients with weak hip and core musculature, which are important muscle groups to rehabilitate after undergoing ACL surgery. Although the surgery to reconstruct or repair the ACL usually takes only 1-2 hours, the rehabilitation can take 6-10 months. Determining the optimal time to return to sports is difficult, and no one test or measurement can determine when you are ready to return after surgery. However, numerous studies have shown that the trunk, hip, and core muscles are important factors in the neuromuscular control of the lower extremity, and that adequately strengthening these muscles after ACL surgery can help prevent against re-injury. In this study, performance on the SLSD test was significantly correlated with hip and core strength, especially in females. Further research will be performed to help determine the role of the SLSD test in predicting injury in athletes.

The research study was performed at the Biodynamics Gait Lab at the University of Kentucky, under the guidance of Mary Lloyd Ireland, MD and Brian Noehren, PT PhD. 

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